Locating Indentity

Documenting my locations and human interactions using text and technology.

They say you don’t get over someone until you find someone or something better. As humans, we don’t deal well with emptiness. Any empty space must be filled. Immediately. The pain of emptiness is too strong. It compels the victim to fill that place. A single moment with that empty spot causes excruciating pain. That’s why we run from distraction to distraction—and from attachment to attachment.

—Yasmin Mogahed   (via coldaslt)

(Source: bluestockingreads, via andyetmethinks)

FUCK

You are not clingy, or needy, or silly for having needs for affection and affirmation and attention within a romantic relationship. Those needs aren’t an embarrassing outgrowth of your low-self esteem or depression or whatever messy emotional issues you may have going on, that’s just basic shit that people need from each other. We of course should not make our partners responsible for meeting all of our emotional needs – it’s not someone’s else’s job to make you happy. But inside a healthy relationship, being able to show affection, pay attention, and demonstrate “you are amazing and important to me” is a pleasure, not some task or burden.

—Jennifer Peepas (via retardgrl)

(Source: psych-facts, via andyetmethinks)

thisbigcity:

shrineart:

haunanodesu:

kitty-von-khaos:

wtf-fun-factss:

The Beijing Subway owners offer its passengers the abilitiy to pay with plastic bottles - WTF fun facts

If all countries offered this, our world would have a revolution.

why is this not a thing in boston i am always carrying a drink with me please make this a thing

This would be AWESOME.

#bestthingever

thisbigcity:

shrineart:

haunanodesu:

kitty-von-khaos:

wtf-fun-factss:

The Beijing Subway owners offer its passengers the abilitiy to pay with plastic bottles - WTF fun facts

If all countries offered this, our world would have a revolution.

why is this not a thing in boston i am always carrying a drink with me please make this a thing

This would be AWESOME.

#bestthingever

(Source: )

urbangeographies:

Rethinking “parklets” in San Francisco

Since beginning to allow local businesses and community groups to create “parklets” in 2009, San Francisco has pioneered these streetside public spaces in what the city initially called the ”temporary urbanism program.” SF agencies developed a program that allows businesses, nonprofits and property owners to apply for permits to convert adjacent on-street parking into public spaces that are open and accessible, though also removable.
The San Francisco Examiner and Planetizen recently reported on the removal of a parklet that had been criticized as “a haven for homelessness and illegal activity” in the Haight-Ashbury district. Observers have interpreted this episode as reflecting the “growing pains” of this conversion of on-street parking into public spaces. With about 40 parklets now scattered around the city (see photos above), and many more requests all the time, Planning Department officials are said to have learned from this incident and others around the City. 
Oversight and guidelines now require detailed descriptions of the design and purpose of parklets as part of the application process. A comprehensive packet released late last year by the Planning Department began to codify the city’s policies on this innovative experiment in the creation of small, incremental, locally created public spaces. Other cities around the country have begun to follow suit in efforts to encourage more vibrant public spaces for pedestrians and local businesses.